Pimp my TextMate2 — Ruby edition

Here at Mikamai It’s no secret I’m a happy TextMate user and early TM2 adopter. I’m always there if either an editor war is catching fire or if someone needs help setting up his editor.

Above all I still find that TextMate is the best choice for a Ruby developer, even if SublimeText, emacs and vim seem more fashionable these days. Even if I’m saving the full list of reasons for another post I’ll tell just this one: TextMate relies on Ruby for a big part of its implementation that has always been opensource*.

Of course I’m talking about bundles, if you’re not convinced look at the code used to align assignments (⌥⌘]) from the source bundle (which is responsible for actions common to any programming language).

Just to be clear I would still use SublimeText if I were to program from Linux or (ugh!) Windows.

That said I want to gather here some of the stuff that makes using TextMate2 for Ruby and Rails development so awesome.

* Of course I know about redcar (which seems quite dead, but I didn’t tried it recently) and other TM clones err enhancements like Chocolat

ALERT: shameless self promotion follows

The Bundles and Settings parade

1. Effortless opening of Bundled Gems ⌥⌘O

This I do all the time, opening the source of bundled gems. Please behold and don’t be horrified. Especially in Ruby-land the source of gems is the best source of documentation, and as explained by Glenn Vanderburg) there’s probably a good reason for that. Also the README and specs are included most of the time and reading other’s code is a healthy activity.

Needless to say that the best place to read source code is your editor.

⌥⌘O will present the complete list of gems from your Gemfile.lock, start typing the first letters of a gem and use arrow if you don’t want to touch the mouse (or trackpad).

opening gems from the current bundle

Source: https://github.com/elia/bundler.tmbundle

2. Beautiful Markdown rendering

No README.md reading activity would be on par with a the GFM rendered version without code blocks highlighting.

This bundle almost looks like GFM while typing, press ⌃⌥⌘P (the standard TM key equivalent for preview) to get it rendered to the HTML window.

Redcarpet Markdown Bundle in action

Bonus Install the Scott Web Theme from Preferences → Bundles for a nice looking preview

Source: https://github.com/streeter/markdown-redcarpet.tmbundle

3. Restart Pow! in a single stroke ⌃⌥⌘R

Restarts the current app detecting a tmp/ directory in current project or in a parent dir.

Falls back to /tmp

Source: https://github.com/elia/pow-server.tmbundle

4. Open the terminal in your current project folder

Works with both Terminal and iTerm, just press ⌃⌥⌘T from a project.

Source: https://github.com/elia/avian-missing.tmbundle

5. Trailing whitespace fix, cross-tab completion and more…

Command Description
⌃⎋ Cross tab completion
⌃⌥⌘T Open Project directory in Terminal
⌃⌥⌘L Keep current file as reference

Source: https://github.com/elia/avian-missing.tmbundle

Installing the whole thing

Download the latest version of TextMate2 here: https://api.textmate.org/downloads/release

mkdir -p ~/Library/Application Support/Avian/Bundles
cd ~/Library/Application Support/Avian/Bundles

git clone https://github.com/elia/avian-missing.tmbundle
git clone https://github.com/elia/bundler.tmbundle
git clone https://github.com/streeter/markdown-redcarpet.tmbundle

# Activate the system ruby (if you're using a Ruby version manager):
type rvm &> /dev/null && rvm use system # for RVM
export RBENV_VERSION="system"           # for rbenv

# Install the required gems
sudo gem install redcarpet -v 2.3.0
sudo gem install pygments.rb

# Trailing whitespace
defaults write com.macromates.TextMate.preview environmentVariables -array-add 
    '{ "enabled" = YES; "name" = "TM_STRIP_WHITESPACE_ON_SAVE"; "value" = "true"; }' # enable trailing whitespace removal and EOF fix

echo <<-INI >> ~/.tm_properties
[ "*.y{,a}ml" ]
# Disable trailing whitespace fix for YAML 
# files that can be broken by this feat.
TM_STRIP_WHITESPACE_ON_SAVE = false
INI

The following will set the tabs/file-browser/html-windows to my current taste, I don’t pretend it matches everyone prefs but can still be useful for cherry-picking.

# File browser fixes and general UI fixes
defaults write com.macromates.TextMate.preview fileBrowserStyle SourceList       # lighblue file browser background
defaults write com.macromates.TextMate.preview fileBrowserPlacement left         # keep it on the left
defaults write com.macromates.TextMate.preview tabsAboveDocument -bool YES       # no tabs above the file browser
defaults write com.macromates.TextMate.preview allowExpandingLinks -bool YES     # make symlinks expandable
defaults write com.macromates.TextMate.preview htmlOutputPlacement right         # place the html output to the right
defaults write com.macromates.TextMate.preview disableTabBarCollapsing -bool YES # keep the tab-bar alway visible
defaults write com.macromates.TextMate.preview scrollPastEnd -bool YES           # give me some air after the file ends

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