Phoenix Framework: the assets pipeline

Updates

From the time I wrote part 1
of this short series, Atom has gained a new Elixir plugin based on Samuel Tonini’s Alchemist Server.
From the Emacs plugin, it inherits all the most notable features such as
autocomplete, jump to definition/documentation for the function/module under
the cursor, quote/unquote code and interactive macro expansion.
A feature reference along with some screenshots can be found at the atom-elixir page.
It also looks pretty good.

The assets pipeline

Assets pipelines are one of the most important features in modern web frameworks.
When working on this task, Phoenix developers have proven that they value
pragmatism over purity and have chosen to base their implementation on Brunch, a Node.js build tool that takes care of everything
related to assets management.
This choice has probably saved man-years of work, that would have inevitably delayed the release of a fully working pipeline system.
A very common counter argument is that this adds node as a dependency, but I
think it’s a negligible inconvenient, node is most probably already present on
the majority of developers machines.

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Phoenix, to the basics and beyond.

Introduction

Phoenix is the exciting new kid on the block in the vast world of web frameworks.
Its roots are in Rails, with the bonus of the performances of a compiled language.
This isn’t exactly a getting started guide, but a (albeit short) list of things you’ll have to know very soon in the process of writing a Phoenix application, that are just a bit beyond the writing a blog engine in 15 minutes by using only the default generators.
I assume previous knowledge of the Elixir language, the Phoenix framework and the command line tools

Continue reading “Phoenix, to the basics and beyond.”